Lewiston High School students take on 2019 rodeo

Senior%2C+Amie+Greenfield%2C+stands+next+to+her+horse+for+the+2019+%22She%27s+Wild%22+Lewiston+Roundup+Sept+9.+
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Lewiston High School students take on 2019 rodeo

Senior, Amie Greenfield, stands next to her horse for the 2019

Senior, Amie Greenfield, stands next to her horse for the 2019 "She's Wild" Lewiston Roundup Sept 9.

Photo courtesy of Greenfield.

Senior, Amie Greenfield, stands next to her horse for the 2019 "She's Wild" Lewiston Roundup Sept 9.

Photo courtesy of Greenfield.

Photo courtesy of Greenfield.

Senior, Amie Greenfield, stands next to her horse for the 2019 "She's Wild" Lewiston Roundup Sept 9.

Wendy Guo, Features Assistant

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  At least four LHS students competed in amateur barrel races for the 85th annual “She’s Wild” rodeo, which took place Sept. 5-7 at the Lewiston Roundup Grounds.

   For amateur girls barrel racing, McKenzie Triplett, a senior, won first place with 18.18 seconds and $176. Chenzi Woods, a sophomore, won 11th place with 19.94 seconds; Hailee Peterson, senior, won 14th place with 20.28 seconds; and Anella Tucker, senior, won 15th place with 20.48 seconds. 

   As part of the festivities, rodeo royalty were there to greet the attendees, including LHS students Amie Greenfield, senior, and Mya Dammon, junior. 

   Rodeo Royalty is a job that promotes the western way of life. Young women become the female representatives of the sport. 

   In Lewiston, there is a royalty program provided by the Lewiston Roundup for those interested to try out. Although most people build experience with smaller royalties such as saddle clubs to work their way up to pro-rodeo or even state titleholders. 

   These women go through a rigorous tryout process that includes horsemanship patterns, interviews, impromptu questionings, and giving speeches. The highest score becomes a queen, and the second and third best scores become princesses. 

   Amie Greenfield, a senior at LHS, is one of the two 2019 Lewiston Roundup Princesses. This is her first year with the title for, 2020, she will hold the title of Lewiston Roundup Queen. Being Rodeo Royalty entails traveling the Pacific Northwest, representing the Lewis-Clark Valley and the Lewiston Roundup. Other responsibilities include having a friendly persona, participating in parades, signing autographs and motivating aspiring cowboys and cowgirls.

   Growing up, Greenfield participated in multiple events such as roping, parades, o-mok-sees and other horse shows. She was no stranger to any of this, riding horses since she was three. In fact before joining the royalty, Greenfield had just finished her last year in 4-H with horses.

   Additionally, in the past three years, she took up roping, which included breakaway and team roping.
   “[I enjoy] being able to represent such an amazing association and my hometown, Within this year, I’m glad I inspired little kids wherever I went.“

   Mya Dammon, junior, is one of the princesses for the Chief Joseph Foundation. The nonprofit helps kids keep out of trouble by providing clinics that teaches them how to ride and take care of horses.

  Dammon has been part of the association for five years, ever since her grandpa presented the opportunity to join. Being of Nez Perce descent, Dammon helps in the representation of the Nez Perce Tribe. She dresses in regalia, traditional clothing tribes would wear, as a sign of respect and pride at events such as the rodeo, parades, fundraisers and other social events.

     “You have to be nice and not get too offended when somebody calls a regalia a costume,” Dammon said. “You have to inform them nicely about what it is.”

   Both Greenfield and Dammon agreed that strong verbal and social skills are major factors in becoming and serving as princesses or queens. 

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